About

Dr Astrid Marner

I am a researcher specialised in the Christian culture of the medieval North. I mainly work with manuscripts and manuscript fragments in a text-centered approach.

Before this project, I was a member of the project From manuscript fragments to book historyat the University of Bergen. This project was funded by Bergen Research Foundation (BFS) and led by prof. Åslaug Ommundsen. There, I was working on office lectionaries, which from Norway are only preserved as small fragments, and the Nidaros Ordinal in its various preserved form. This work is still going on.

Other research activities cover sermon preaching in medieval Iceland and Norway, fourteenth-century Skálholt as a cultural hub, the distribution and use of Peter Comestor's Historia scholastica in the North, and Grimr Holmsteinsson's Jóns saga baptista II.

Off work, I enjoy family time, yoga, swimming, reading, crafts, and gardening. I live with my partner and our daughter near Copenhagen.

The location

INVISIBILIA works with the manuscripts held in the Arnamagnaean Collections in Copenhagen and Reykjavik, which represent approximately 90 % of the total number of Old Norse codices. Out of these, many contain both Old Norse and Latin texts.

The manuscript collections in Copenhagen and Reykjavík have a dual history and are jointly registered as UNESCO World Cultural Heritage: They host almost 3,000 manuscripts collected by the Icelandic scholar Árni Magnússon in Copenhagen until the early eighteenth century. During the second half of the 20th century, ca. 1,600 manuscripts were returned to Iceland and are now kept at the Stofnun Árna Magnússonar í íslenskum fræðum in Reykjavík, while the remainder is kept at the Arnamagnæan Institute at the University of Copenhagen. Besides the original manuscripts, the Copenhagen collection also has photographs of the manuscripts returned to Iceland.

Funding

This project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 654147. It takes the form of an Individual Fellowship designed to promote the career of individual researchers through mobility.

You can read more about Marie Skłodowska-Curie actions here.

Interested in applying? Find relevant information here.